Variable Valve Timing System (Vanos, VVT, VCT, CVVT) is an electro-hydraulic device that adjusts the timing of the engine valves by changing the angular positions of the camshafts relative to each other. This system was first introduced in 1992 by the BMW company. Today, similar systems are used by virtually every manufacturer of petrol engines.

The use of a VVT system contributes to:

  • - higher torque achieved at low engine speeds
  • - higher power at high engine speeds
  • - lower fuel consumption
  • - lower exhaust emissions

Trade names of variable valve timing systems used by car engine manufacturers:

  • - AVCS (Subaru)
  • - AVLS (Subaru)
  • - CPS (Proton)
  • - CVTCS (Nissan, Infiniti)
  • - CVVT (Alfa Romeo, Citroën, Geely, Hyundai, Iran Khodro, Kia, Peugeot, Renault, Volvo)
  • - DCVCP - dual continuous variable cam phasing (General Motors)
  • - DVVT (Daihatsu) (Perodua)
  • - MIVEC (Mitsubishi)
  • - MultiAir (Fiat)
  • - N-VCT (Nissan)
  • - S-VT (Mazda)
  • - Ti-VCT (Ford)
  • - VANOS (BMW)
  • - VarioCam (Porsche)
  • - VCT (Ford, Yamaha)
  • - VTEC (Honda, Acura)
  • - VVC (MG Rover)
  • - VVL (Nissan)
  • - Valvelift (Audi)
  • - VVEL (Nissan, Infiniti)
  • - VVT (Chrysler, General Motors, Proton, Suzuki, Volkswagen Group)
  • - VVT-i (Toyota, Lexus)
  • - VTVT (Hyundai, Kia)